Skip to main content

HELBLING READERS BLOG

Reading for the environment: Interview with Rosa Tiziana Bruno

October 05, 2021 by Nóra Wünsch-Nagy

In our Reading for the environment blog series, we have a special interview to share. We talked to Rosa Tiziana Bruno, who is an educator, sociologist and writer. Her research project uses literature to help young students reconnect with the natural world, strengthening all their skills in the process. Her book "Educating in ecological thinking" is full of practical ideas that teachers and parents can use to help develop self-awareness in their students and harmonize with the world around them. Currently, her project is a candidate for the UNESCO Japan 2021 prize on education for sustainable development.

  • Read more about her teaching research project here.
  • Check out her Italian website here.

Interview: Ecological thinking and narratives in the language class

Your work largely builds on the power of storytelling in affecting change. When and how did your interest in using stories in education begin?

It all started, if I recall correctly, a long time ago. I have a distinct memory of spending afternoons when I was a child, listening to my mother telling stories. I was engrossed by the fairy-tale world in her books and the happiness I felt is difficult to describe. But that’s not all, those stories got me thinking and stirred up a myriad of questions in me. I had understood for the first time the incredible power of storytelling and how it can bring about personal growth. From that moment on, stories and storytelling have held a privileged position in my day-to-day life. So, as an adult, it was a natural choice to become a children’s author in order to give back to my young readers the same joy that I felt when I read as a child. My role as an educational sociologist takes me in the same direction, as the awareness that stories are fundamental to our lives lies at the basis of my work. 

Your latest book is “Educare al pensiero ecologico” (Educating for ecological thinking). What made you choose this theme for your book?

Some years ago, I was carrying out an action-research project into the problems faced by students at school, in particular on the difficulty of creating relationships within the class and on developing a sense of community. I soon realised that many of the problems that arose (hyperactivity, aggression, bullying, attention-deficit, low self-esteem, pessimism) were connected to a phenomenon which the American author Richard Louv calls  “Nature deficit disorder”. Our progressive disconnection from nature is having profound repercussions on both our physical and psychological health, which is then reflected in our social relations in all circles, starting from school. 

This was a very important discovery for me, and I soon realised the urgent need to reconnect with nature and introduce the development of an ecological consciousness into the school syllabus. 

But in order to establish effective educational programmes, we first need to train our teachers. We need to create a dialogue and share information on these issues. So, as part of my research, I developed and set up a sustainability education programme for all types of schools.

My book “Educare al pensiero ecologico” was born from this, and highlights my research findings, giving teachers and parents/guardians a concrete approach to follow in their role of educators.

Margaret Atwood says that stories are special for many reasons, and one of them is that they are the key to human survival. Do you believe that teachers can contribute to helping the environment by integrating stories into their teaching? Do you think stories can help us survive (or, escape) the current environmental threats we are all facing?

As an educational sociologist I have seen for myself the power that literature, one of the most noble forms of narration, can have in the class. 

Books offer the possibility of reflecting deeply on important issues, they are windows which open onto multiple aspects of reality. Picture books, in particular, which are a combination of text and illustration, are a huge resource when educating for ecological thinking as they develop the readers’ observation and listening skills. Honing our listening skills is essential when relating both to other people and to the natural world, allowing us to become aware of the connection that exists between each one of us and the rest of creation. Reading aloud in class, if carried out correctly, is a highly effective tool towards developing active listening skills. 

Fiabadiario (or Tale-diary), the educational path I refer to in the book, is based on literature and the natural world, and aims to develop ecological wisdom in young learners through a 5-step process as shown in the diagram below. The process starts by asking the learners to reflect on the natural world through literature and gradually develops into them having direct contact with nature. 


We carried out an experimental programme for two years with outstanding results, managing to create an authentic educating community in which the students learn to create sustainable relationships. Because it is evident, that in order to safeguard life on Earth we must address climate change and even more importantly, human relations. 

If we continue to behave like predators towards other humans as well as the natural world, we have no hope of saving ourselves.

As a sociologist and teacher you must have insights into how stories can transform people and communities. What kind of stories do you think can help students (of any age) see our environment differently? What are your favourite stories about the environment to share with children and teenagers?

I believe that picture books are an extraordinary educational tool to use with all age groups in any teaching context. 

Picture books are much more than illustrated stories, they are often real works of art that are born from a magical fusion of visual and verbal narratives. This special fusion allows the reader to enter deeply into the story using all of his or her senses. 

In step one of my Fiabadiario programme we used lots of picture books which immediately captured the readers’ attention. Reading a picture book in class means not only activating the students’ imagination and listening skills but also their observation, and even their senses of touch and smell, as the illustrations encourage the children to handle the book in a natural way, touching it and smelling the scent of the paper. When we choose books, we don’t need to restrict ourselves to ‘nature’ stories. Nature is omnipresent in literature, because writers talk about life and in doing so they inevitably talk about nature, too. In order to create an effective educational path, choose rich stories, with beautiful illustrations which can get the students thinking and encourage them to explore the world.

What advice can you give to teachers who would like to focus more on developing their students’ ecological thinking and environmental awareness?

I always tell the teachers I work with to throw themselves into this educational adventure without being afraid of making mistakes. Fiabadiario was created to encourage all types of teachers to leave their fears behind and get involved. The best way to educate for ecological thinking is to build a community with your students, transform the class into a research community when everyone welcomes and can feel the beauty of having sustainable relationships, free from bullying and discrimination.

Thank you for the interview!

You can read the interview in Italian below.

Ecological thinking and narratives in the language class

Your work largely builds on the power of storytelling in affecting change. When and how did your interest in using stories in education begin?

Si tratta, credo, di un inizio lontano nel tempo. Ho un ricordo nitido di alcuni pomeriggi della mia infanzia, quando ascoltavo le storie che mi leggeva mia madre. Ero affascinata dall’incredibile mondo fiabesco che spuntava fuori dai libri e provavo una gioia difficile da descrivere. Ma non solo, quei racconti suscitavano in me mille curiosità, riflessioni, domande. È stato allora che ho scoperto il potere straordinario della narrazione e la sua capacità di accompagnare la crescita interiore. Da quel momento in poi, l’arte del racconto ha occupato un posto privilegiato nella mia vita quotidiana. Così, da adulta, mi è venuto naturale scegliere di fare la scrittrice per ragazzi, per restituire ai più piccoli la stessa gioia che ho provato leggendo nella mia infanzia. Anche la mia professione di sociologa dell’educazione si muove nella stessa direzione, alla base di tutte le mie attività lavorative c’è la consapevolezza che la narrazione è fondamentale per la vita.

Your latest book is “Educare al pensiero ecologico.” What made you choose this theme for your book?

Qualche anno fa stavo conducendo una action-research sul disagio giovanile a scuola, si trattava di una ricerca sociologica sulle difficoltà di relazione all’interno delle classi e sullo sviluppo del senso di comunità. Ben presto mi sono resa conto che molti aspetti del disagio giovanile (iperattività, aggressività, bullismo, deficit di attenzione, mancanza di autostima, pessimismo) erano in realtà riconducibili al “Nature deficit disorder”, un fenomeno ampiamente documentato dallo studioso inglese Richard Louv. Il progressivo distacco dalla natura, infatti, causa un profondo malessere psicofisico che inevitabilmente si ripercuote sulle relazioni sociali, in tutti gli ambienti, a cominciare da quello scolastico.

È stata una scoperta molto importante, che mi ha fatto vedere in modo chiaro l’urgenza di recuperare un contatto equilibrato con gli elementi naturali e la necessità di un’educazione scolastica mirata allo sviluppo di una coscienza ecologica.

Ma, per realizzare dei percorsi educativi davvero efficaci, occorre prima di tutto formare gli insegnanti. C’è davvero bisogno di un confronto su questi temi e di un passaggio di informazioni. Così, sempre nel corso della ricerca, ho elaborato e implementato un percorso di educazione alla sostenibilità per le scuole di ogni ordine e grado.

È nato in questo modo il libro “Educare al pensiero ecologico”, che appunto contiene i risultati di questa mia ricerca e fornisce a docenti e genitori la proposta concreta di un percorso didattico a cui potersi ispirare nel loro lavoro di educatori.

Margaret Atwood says that stories are special for many reasons, and one of them is that they are the key to human survival. Do you believe that teachers can contribute to helping the environment by integrating stories in their teaching? Do you think stories can help us survive (better to say, escape) the current environmental threats we are all facing?

Come sociologa dell’educazione ho avuto modo di sperimentare nelle scuole il potere della letteratura, che è una delle forme più nobili di narrazione.

I libri offrono la possibilità di accendere riflessioni profonde su temi importanti, sono vere e proprie finestre da cui affacciarsi per osservare i molteplici aspetti della realtà. In particolare le storie contenute nei picture books, che nascono dalla fusione tra testo e immagine, risultano preziose per educare al pensiero ecologico perché aiutano ad allenare la capacità di osservare e ascoltare. Coltivare la capacità di ascolto è essenziale per entrare in relazione con l’altro e con gli elementi naturali, arrivando ad acquisire la consapevolezza del legame che esiste tra noi e tutti gli altri esseri viventi. La lettura ad alta voce in classe, se praticata nel modo giusto, è un ottimo strumento di educazione all’ascolto attivo.

Il percorso didattico Fiabadiario di cui parlo nel libro “Educare al pensiero ecologico”, è articolato in cinque fasi e si basa sull’incontro tra letteratura e natura, con l’obiettivo di sviluppare ecosaggezza nei piccoli. [vedi foto] Si procede gradualmente, partendo dalla riflessione sul mondo naturale, incoraggiata dalla lettura, fino ad arrivare al contatto diretto con la Natura.

Dopo una sperimentazione durata due anni, i risultati sono stati entusiasmanti, siamo riusciti a creare una autentica comunità educante in cui bambini e ragazzi imparano a creare relazioni sostenibili. Perché, ormai è chiaro, per salvaguardare la vita del pianeta bisogna porre attenzione al cambiamento climatico ma ancora di più alle relazioni umane.

Finché continueremo ad avere un atteggiamento da predatori verso i nostri simili e verso gli elementi naturali, non potremo sperare di salvarci.

As a sociologist and teacher you must have insights into how stories can transform people and communities. What kind of stories do you think can help students (of any age) see our environment differently? What are your favourite stories about the environment to share with children and teenagers?

Credo che le storie dei picture books siano uno strumento didattico straordinario, da usare a tutte le età e in ogni tipo di situazione educativa.

Non si tratta semplicemente di libri illustrati, ma di autentiche opere d’arte che nascono da una magica fusione di parole e immagini. È questa speciale fusione che consente al lettore di entrare in profondità nella storia, utilizzando tutti i sensi.

Nella mia ricerca, durante la fase 1 dedicata alla lettura ad alta voce, abbiamo utilizzati tanti picture books che si sono rivelati dei grandi catalizzatori di attenzione. Leggere un picture book in classe significa non soltanto attivare l’immaginazione e l’ascolto, ma anche l’osservazione visiva e persino il tatto e l’odorato, perché le immagini esercitano un enorme fascino che spinge i bambini a maneggiare il libro come un ‘oggetto naturale’, quindi a toccarlo e ad annusare il profumo della carta con curiosità. Per quanto riguarda la scelta delle storie, non è necessario concentrarsi su quelle che trattano in maniera esplicita il tema “natura”. La natura è sempre presente nella letteratura, perché gli scrittori raccontano la vita e dunque è inevitabile che dentro le loro storie finiscano pezzi di natura. Per realizzare un buon percorso di educazione ecologica basta scegliere storie intense, non banali, con immagini artistiche di buon livello, in grado di stimolare riflessioni e incoraggiare l’atteggiamento di esplorazione del mondo.

What advice can you give to teachers who would like to focus more on developing their students’ ecological thinking and environmental awareness?

Agli insegnanti con cui lavoro dico sempre di lanciarsi nell’avventura educativa abbandonando il timore di sbagliare. Il percorso didattico ‘Fiabadiario’ è nato proprio con l’intento di invitare gli insegnanti a mettersi in gioco senza timore, ciascuno con la propria sensibilità. Il miglior modo per educare al pensiero ecologico è fare comunità con i propri studenti, trasformare la classe in una autentica comunità di ricerca in cui ciascuno possa sentirsi pienamente accolto e tutti possano sperimentare la bellezza di vivere ‘relazioni sostenibili’, val a dire eliminando ogni atteggiamento aggressivo e di sopraffazione.

Thank you for the interview!